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Debating Prop. 1: The big, fat, California water bond




Dry cracked earth is visible on the banks of Shasta Lake at Bailey Cove August 31, 2014 in Lakehead, California.
Dry cracked earth is visible on the banks of Shasta Lake at Bailey Cove August 31, 2014 in Lakehead, California.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Known as the "save our water" proposition by its supporters, Proposition 1 authorizes the state of California to sell $7.1 billion in bonds to battle the drought by paying for groundwater cleanup, water recycling and watershed restoration. A "yes" vote on the measure would also allow $425 million dollars in existing bond funds to be redirected to the general fund, making it a grand total of $7.5 billion. Previously called Proposition 43, it was renamed Proposition 1 to improve its visibility to voters. Prop 1 was scaled down from $11 to $7 billion dollars before it was signed by Governor Jerry Brown.

But opponents of Prop. 1 call the plan a "giveaway of taxpayer money," claiming that it will focus too much on the building of dam. Critics also say it doesn't devote enough attention to near-term drought relief. Furthermore, they contend it does nothing to promote self-sufficiency or cut down dependence on water sources.

Do you think Proposition 1 goes far enough in addressing the causes of the drought? Will it provide the relief to Californians in drought-stricken areas?

Guest:

Molly Peterson, KPCC’s environmental correspondent 

Steve Fleischli, Water Program Director and senior attorney at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). He is based in L.A.

Adam Scow, Director at Food & Water Watch, a non-profit that working to ensure access to safe and affordable drinking water

Jason Peltier, Deputy General Manager at Westlands Water District, which provides water supply to its landowners and water users



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