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Wine vineyards need new strategy to maintain flavors threatened by climate change, study says




 A worker inspects cabernet sauvignon wine grapes at the Stags' Leap Winery September 27, 2004 in Napa, California.
A worker inspects cabernet sauvignon wine grapes at the Stags' Leap Winery September 27, 2004 in Napa, California.
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Wine producers globally have to change harvest patterns to maintain the sugars and acids in chardonnay, pinot noir and the like, according to a new study. Kimberly Nicholas, study author and wine consultant, said flavors of your favorite wines are changing already. Unusually high temperatures in France, Spain and Italy mean greater grape yields and faster growth, which leads to vineyards struggling over the right time to pick before the sugars rises too sharply and the acidity drops too precipitously.

What does it mean for California wine production (and Oregon and Washington for that matter)? After all, who wants to face global warming without a bottle of wine handy.

Guest:

Kimberly Nicholas, Associate Professor of Sustainability Science at Lund University in Sweden; Nicholas’ family has a small vineyard in Sonoma County, growing Cabernet grapes