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Attack in Paris: Threat assessment, manhunt and mourning




This combo shows handout photos released by French Police in Paris early on January 8, 2015 of suspects Cherif Kouachi (L), aged 32, and his brother Said Kouachi (R), aged 34, wanted in connection with an attack at the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo in the French capital that killed at least 12 people. French police on January 8 published photos of the two brothers wanted as suspects over the bloody massacre at the magazine in Paris as they launched an appeal to the public for information.
This combo shows handout photos released by French Police in Paris early on January 8, 2015 of suspects Cherif Kouachi (L), aged 32, and his brother Said Kouachi (R), aged 34, wanted in connection with an attack at the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo in the French capital that killed at least 12 people. French police on January 8 published photos of the two brothers wanted as suspects over the bloody massacre at the magazine in Paris as they launched an appeal to the public for information.
FRENCH POLICE/AFP/Getty Images

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A massive manhunt and a day of mourning grip Paris today following yesterday's massacre of 12 people at a satirical newspaper. French police are hunting two heavily armed brothers suspected in the murders, with many worried the suspects' desperation could spur another attack. French Prime Minister Manuel Valls said the two suspects still at large in the slayings - Cherif Kouachi, 32, and Said Kouachi, 34 - were known to France's intelligence services.

A third suspect, Mourad Hamyd, 18, surrendered at a police station after hearing his name linked to the attacks, a Paris prosecutor's spokeswoman said. Security experts have contrary views on the level of sophistication of the attack. Former CIA Director Michael Hayden told NBC it was a "high level attack." 

However, terrorism expert Brian Michael Jenkins with the RAND Corporation think thank downplayed the level of training necessary to pull off such an operation. France remains on high alert, but what does yesterday's attack indicate for alert levels going forward?

With files from the Associated Press.

Guest:

Angeline Benoit, reporter for Bloomberg News

Brian Michael Jenkins, Senior Advisor to the President of the Rand Corporation and one of the nation's leading experts on terrorism and homeland security