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LA port slowdown’s impact on your wallet




The Maersk cargo container terminal is idle at Los Angeles harbor as an eight-day strike by International Longshore and Warehouse Unions continues at busiest seaport in the nation on December 4, 2012 in Los Angeles, California.
The Maersk cargo container terminal is idle at Los Angeles harbor as an eight-day strike by International Longshore and Warehouse Unions continues at busiest seaport in the nation on December 4, 2012 in Los Angeles, California.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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Retailers and business owners across the Southland are feeling the pinch of a work slowdown at the nation’s two busiest ports. Secretary of Labor Tom Perez has been called in to mediate the dispute between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association.

The two sides began negotiations on a new contract in May. Over the weekend, employers locked out workers who they say have intentionally slowed down work to get an upper hand at the bargaining table. Work has resumed since Tuesday. A prolonged port shutdown could cost businesses as much as $7 billion this year, according to one analysis

If you are a business owner, how has the port dispute affected your business? What impact has it had on consumers?

Guests:

Justin Pritchard, reporter for the Associated Press based in Los Angeles who’s been covering the dispute

Kevin Klowden, economist and managing director of the California Center at the Milken Institute, a nonprofit economic think tank