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Debating the decision to strike down Jessica’s Law




Angie Bryant, mother of nine-year-old Jessica Lunsford, cries as she receives a hug during a memorial service for her daughter March 19, 2005 in Lebanon, Ohio. Jessica Lunsford was abducted and murdered in Florida. The Jessica Lunford Act also known as
Angie Bryant, mother of nine-year-old Jessica Lunsford, cries as she receives a hug during a memorial service for her daughter March 19, 2005 in Lebanon, Ohio. Jessica Lunsford was abducted and murdered in Florida. The Jessica Lunford Act also known as "Jessica's Law" was enacted following the tragedy.
Mike Simons/Getty Images

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The California Supreme Court struck down one of the central provisions of Jessica’s Law on Monday, and while the ruling currently only applies to San Diego County, some are saying it’s a sign that residential limits for registered sex offenders in other counties in California could be changing soon too.

In the ruling, Justice Marvin Baxter wrote that the law has severely limited the rights and freedoms of registered sex offenders, limited though they are, and has created circumstances that make it harder for offenders to be monitored and rehabbed.

Do you support the Court’s decision? Will this be a harbinger of change for residential limits for sex offenders in other counties?

Guests:

Ernest Galvan, partner at Rosen, Bien, Galvan, & Grunfield, LLP. He represented the four registered sex-offenders who originally sued the state over Jessica’s Law.

George Runner, former State Senator and co-author of Jessica’ Law. He’s currently the vice chair of the Board of Equalization, representing District 1.



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