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Is the future of virtual reality now? Observers and makers weigh in




A woman wearing 3D glasses tests a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) virtual reality theatre during its presentation at the Industrial Centre for Virtual Reality in Saint-Nazaire on December 1, 2014. This CAVE is unique of its kind in France with a five-sided HD cellar of 3x3m whose aim is to obtain the perfect image in a realistic and interactive 3D immersion.
A woman wearing 3D glasses tests a Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) virtual reality theatre during its presentation at the Industrial Centre for Virtual Reality in Saint-Nazaire on December 1, 2014. This CAVE is unique of its kind in France with a five-sided HD cellar of 3x3m whose aim is to obtain the perfect image in a realistic and interactive 3D immersion.
GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images

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Virtual reality technology has been around for decades, with everyone from Google to Disney to videogame makers making big investments in the technology. Is VR about to go mainstream?

Watch the video below to see an example of one of the VR uses we'll be discussing, an "immersive journalism" project that uses VR technology to tell the story of the war in Syria.

Guests:

Ben Delaney, founder of and CEO of CyberEdge information services, a marketing consultancy on use and adoption of virtual reality technologies. He's the author of "Sex, Drugs and Tessellation: The Truth About Virtual Reality" (CyberEdge information Services, 2014)

Mark Bolas, director for Mixed Reality Research, the Institute for Creative Technologies, USC. He’s also an Associate Professor at the film school

Nonny de la Peña, director of the virtual reality journalism project called "Project Syria." She’s also a PhD student at USC.