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Heinz and Kraft’s merger: A capitalist love story




A Kraft Foods sign is displayed near its corporate headquarters August 5, 2003 in Northfield, Illinois.
A Kraft Foods sign is displayed near its corporate headquarters August 5, 2003 in Northfield, Illinois.
Tim Boyle/Getty Images

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Philadelphia cream cheese, Heinz ketchup and Oscar Mayer meats not only share fridge space in most American homes, they now make up the world’s fifth-biggest food and beverage company.

H.J. Heinz Co. and Kraft Foods Group will collectively be known as The Kraft Heinz Co., a merge that may be the start of a new trend with other food companies struggling to see profit growth as more consumers are choosing healthier, organic options over processed foods.  

Kraft made headlines recently when its processed cheese product, Kraft Singles was given a nutritional seal from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Which even got push back from satirist king Jon Stewart.

How much marketing prowess will this add to Heinz and Krafts brands? Does this mark the beginning of the end for processed foods? 

Guests:

Marion Nestle, Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University. She is the author of a number of books on nutrition and food safety, including “Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health” (University of California Press, 2013), which she co-authored with Michael Pollan.