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Tesla Model S improvements include driverless capabilities and an app to alleviate ‘range anxiety’




A Tesla Motors vehicle is seen on the showroom floor at the Dadeland Mall on February 19, 2014 in Miami, Florida.
A Tesla Motors vehicle is seen on the showroom floor at the Dadeland Mall on February 19, 2014 in Miami, Florida.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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Ever thought to yourself: “I wish my car could pick me up.” Now there’s an app for that.

Tesla is diligently working on software that may drive state regulators and insurers mad, namely the ability for your car to have certain autonomous or ‘autopilot’ functionality.

Although the automaker is also planning on alleviating ‘range anxiety,’ or the fear that drivers of electric cars will get stuck on the road without the ability to charge a battery, it’s the thought of cars driving people that has propelled Tesla to the latest headlines. Tesla plans on releasing the software update this summer.

Now that cars can park themselves and have become increasingly autonomous, should we accept self-driving cars as the future of travel? Who is liable if a ‘hands-free’ or ‘driverless’ car hits someone?

Guest:

Antuan Goodwin, Associate Editor at Car Technology at CNET