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As Wisconsin’s Bo Ryan slams ‘one-and-done,’ a look at the alternatives




Head coach Bo Ryan of the Wisconsin Badgers reacts after a play in the second half against the Duke Blue Devils during the NCAA Men's Final Four National Championship at Lucas Oil Stadium on April 6, 2015 in Indianapolis, Indiana.
Head coach Bo Ryan of the Wisconsin Badgers reacts after a play in the second half against the Duke Blue Devils during the NCAA Men's Final Four National Championship at Lucas Oil Stadium on April 6, 2015 in Indianapolis, Indiana.
Andy Lyons/Getty Images

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Duke Blue Devils beat the Wisconsin Badgers last night to capture a fifth NCAA title under coach Mike Krzyzewski.

The game was a nailbiter up to the final minutes between the two top teams. As evenly-matched as they are, there is one difference: the Blue Devils are thought of as a "one-and-done" team, made up of freshmen that will likely enter the NBA draft after playing for a year, while the Badgers are known to cultivate committed players.

The "one-and-done" rule has been in place since 2006, which barred players from entering the NBA draft straight out of high school. The system has been much maligned, and critics have long called for its dismantlement.

What are other alternatives? Do you think the “one-and-done” rule harms college basketball?

Guests:

Warren K. Zola, Adjunct professor of Sports Law and the Business of Sports at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College; contributor to Sports Law Blog

Jeff Borzello, writer at ESPN.com’s College Basketball Insider. He tweets @JeffBorzello