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100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide remembered in Southern California




People lay flowers at the Tsitsernakaberd Armenian Genocide Memorial in Yerevan on April 21,2015. Armenians prepare to commemorate on April 24 a hundred years since 1.5 million of their kin were massacred by Ottoman forces, as a fierce dispute still rages with Turkey over Ankara's refusal to recognize the mass murder as genocide.
People lay flowers at the Tsitsernakaberd Armenian Genocide Memorial in Yerevan on April 21,2015. Armenians prepare to commemorate on April 24 a hundred years since 1.5 million of their kin were massacred by Ottoman forces, as a fierce dispute still rages with Turkey over Ankara's refusal to recognize the mass murder as genocide.
KAREN MINASYAN/AFP/Getty Images

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Tomorrow marks the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide, in which over a million Armenians were killed by the Ottoman government in what is now present-day Turkey.

The US still has not recognized the mass killing as a genocide.

What is the legacy of the genocide? How does it affect for today's Armenian-Americans and global politics?

Guests:

Ronald Suny, author of "'They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else': A History of the Armenian Genocide” (Princeton University Press, 2015); Professor of Social and Political History at the University of Michigan

Nora Hovsepian, Chair, Armenian National Committee of America, Western Region, an Armenian American grassroots political organization

Ergun Kirlikovali, former president of the Assembly of Turkish American Associations, 2013-2015