Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Sneak Peek at The Autry’s 'Empire and Liberty: The Civil War and the West' exhibit




American Progress
American Progress
The Autry
American Progress
Grant Gun
The Autry
American Progress
Slave Collar
The Autry
American Progress
Peace Medal Box
The Autry
American Progress
Votes for Women
The Autry
American Progress
Lincoln Life Mask
The Autry
American Progress
Pico Drum
The Autry
American Progress
Nikon D70
American Progress
Lee Portrait
The Autry
American Progress
Kicking Bear - The Battle of Little Bighorn
The Autry
American Progress
Lincoln Receiving the Comanche, Indiana History Center
The Autry
American Progress
Fort Laramie Peace Commission
The Autry
American Progress
Certificate of Residence
The Autry
American Progress
Chinese Worker's Jacket
The Autry
American Progress
Custer Civil War Belt and Buckle
The Autry
American Progress
Tools
The Autry
American Progress
13th Amendment Lithograph
The Autry
American Progress
9th Cavalry Parade Flag
The Autry
American Progress
Fremont Flag
The Autry
American Progress
Bill of Sale
The Autry
American Progress
Bugle
The Autry
American Progress
African American Soldier at Benton Barracks, Missouri
The Autry via Library of Congress


Listen to story

13:47
Download this story 6MB

Most discussions of the American Civil War don’t include much, if any, mention of the West and its role in the conflict.

However, the influence that Westward expansion had on the issues that shaped the Civil War is undeniable, and it’s the subject of the newest exhibit at The Autry National Center of the American West.

Empire and Liberty: The Civil War and the West” brings together a large collection of Civil War-era artifacts, the majority of which come from The Autry’s own collection, as well as the personal stories of well known Americans like Jesse James and Sacagawea to some of the lesser-known figures, like Andres Pico, brother of former California governor Pio Pico.

It dives into slavery in the South as well as the other forms it took across America at the time, bringing visitors on a journey from the 1820s as Native Americans were being pushed west from the south, to the Civil War era, to Reconstruction and post-war Westward expansion.

The exhibit opens on Saturday at The Autry and will run through the beginning of January 2016.

Guest:

Carolyn Brucken, co-curator of the new exhibit and curator of Western Women’s History at the Autry National Center