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California extremist Adam Gadahn and the future of U.S. military drone policy




US President Barack Obama makes a statement on the Brady Briefing room at the White House April 23, 2015 in Washington, DC.  President Obama talked about a US drone strike that targeted a suspected al Qaeda compound in Pakistan but inadvertently killed an American and Italian being held hostage by the group.
US President Barack Obama makes a statement on the Brady Briefing room at the White House April 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. President Obama talked about a US drone strike that targeted a suspected al Qaeda compound in Pakistan but inadvertently killed an American and Italian being held hostage by the group.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

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The White House revealed today that a U.S. drone strike had inadvertently killed two hostages – an American and an Italian – held by Al Qaeda in January.

In a news conference held shortly after the disclosure, President Obama offered his apology to the families of Warren Weinstein and Giovanni Lo Porto, who were held by the terrorist group since 2011 and 2012, respectively, adding that he takes “full responsibility” for the drone strike. The White House also announced that they believe another drone operation took out Adam Gadahn, a native Californian who joined Al Qaeda.

What’s the impact of the incident on U.S. military drone use going forward? Would this change the American public’s view on the use of military drones?

Guests:

Nick Schou, Managing Editor, OC Weekly. He profiled extremist Adam Gadahn, a Riverside, CA native who was killed by a U.S. drone strike in January

Stephen Vladeck, Professor of law at American University Law School; former executive editor of The Yale Law Journal