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Longtime residents react to relative calm in Baltimore




Protestors say the Lord's Prayer beside riot police the night after citywide riots over the death of Freddie Gray on April 28, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland.
Protestors say the Lord's Prayer beside riot police the night after citywide riots over the death of Freddie Gray on April 28, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland.
Mark Makela/Getty Images

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The violence of Monday night in Baltimore gave way to a quieter night last evening. A combination of 10 p.m. curfew, large police presence, and community pushback against the rioting combined to do the trick.

Nevertheless, things are far from normal in the city. The Orioles are playing today's game at Camden Yards without any fans in attendance. Major League Baseball decided to keep fans away in case violence continued into today. However, the Symphony Orchestra invited people to come out for a free concert, in an effort to bring the city together.

Friday is a big day in the ongoing story of Freddie Gray's death. Prosecutors are expected to get preliminary results of the investigation into how Gray died. It's unclear at what point results will be publicly released.

Guests:

Lance Lucas, President of the Greater Baltimore Black Chamber of Commerce

Antero Pietila, a former reporter who worked at the Baltimore Sun for 35 years. He’s the author of “Not In My Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City” (Ivan R. Dee, 2010), a book that looks at the racial history of Baltimore