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Why Governor Brown is rolling back Delta project




A bridge on Highway 4 over the Old River, built in 1915, accommodates only one large truck at a time on September 28, 2005 west of Stockton, California. Officials say that the dikes of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta are in worse shape than those that broke and flooded New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina.
A bridge on Highway 4 over the Old River, built in 1915, accommodates only one large truck at a time on September 28, 2005 west of Stockton, California. Officials say that the dikes of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta are in worse shape than those that broke and flooded New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina.
David McNew/Getty Images

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Governor Brown is expected to announce today that the state is dramatically reducing the amount of fish and wildlife habitat it plans to preserve in connection to the $25 billion twin-tunnels project under the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta.

California Department of Fish and Game Director Chuck Bonham told The Associated Press Wednesday that the project now calls for restoring 30,000 acres for wetland and wildlife habitat - down from 100,000 acres.        

The original environmental improvements were projected to cost $8 billion, and officials said the new plans to be announced Thursday will cost about $300 million. The plan immediately drew criticism from environmental and conservation groups.

With files from Association Press

Guests:

Chelsea Tu, staff attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity, where she works on limiting land development and preserving freshwater resources for the public and endangered species

Jason Peltier, Deputy General Manager at Westlands Water District, which provides water supply to its landowners and water users