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Beverly Hills mayor reacts to mandatory water cuts from Sacramento




A gardener walks past a row of sprinklers watering plants and foliage in front of an apartment complex in South Pasadena, California on January 21, 2014.
A gardener walks past a row of sprinklers watering plants and foliage in front of an apartment complex in South Pasadena, California on January 21, 2014.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

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Last night, the State Water Resources Control Board unanimously approved Governor Brown’s executive order for cities to cut water use by 25%.

The vote comes in light of the latest data that shows cumulative water savings since last summer came in at under 10%. On average, cities will have to cut 25% of their water use to be in line with regulations that take effect this summer, although water suppliers face individual goals ranging from 8% to 36%.

Among the municipalities that will face the steepest cuts are Beverly Hills (151 gallons per person in January) and La Cañada Flintridge (191 gallons per person in January). Some of these cities have already passed water conservation measures, although how much they can curb their denizens use is yet to be seen.

For example, Beverly Hills is banning draining and refilling of swimming pools, limiting landscape irrigation to two days a week, and mandating car washes at commercial venues. But despite raising the maximum fine for water wasting to $1,000, the guidelines are unclear regarding the extent to which the city will enforce the regulations and fine and/or cut off water to violators.

What restrictions should cities place on their residents, and how will they enforce them?

Guests:

Frances Spivy-Weber, vice chairwoman for the Water Resources Control Board

Dr. Julian Gold, MD, Mayor of Beverly Hills