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Appeals court rules NSA phone data is illegal, so why isn’t it stopping the practice?




Medea Benjamin of CodePink protests as Director of the National Security Agency Gen. Keith Alexander (L) waits for the beginning of a hearing before the House (Select) Intelligence Committee October 29, 2013 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.
Medea Benjamin of CodePink protests as Director of the National Security Agency Gen. Keith Alexander (L) waits for the beginning of a hearing before the House (Select) Intelligence Committee October 29, 2013 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

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A federal appeals court ruled this morning that the National Security Agency's collection of data on every American's phone call violates the law.

It's the first time an appellate court has ruled on the so-called metadata program, but the judge declined to take any immediate action, preferring to wait for Congress to act. What are the implications of the ruling as Congress debates reauthorizing the Patriot Act?

Guests:

Josh Gerstein, senior reporter for POLITICO who’s been reporting on the NSA ruling