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You want kale with that? The future of McDonald’s and fast food marketing




A McDonald's employee prepares an order during a one-day hiring event at a McDonald's restaurant on April 19, 2011 in San Francisco, California.
A McDonald's employee prepares an order during a one-day hiring event at a McDonald's restaurant on April 19, 2011 in San Francisco, California.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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In an effort to battle slumping sales, new McDonalds CEO Steve Easterbrook is making some big changes to the iconic burger joint.

He plans to not only streamline the company’s corporate structure and sell off several thousand stores, but also make changes to the menu and service practices. McDonald's has said it plans to bring back its third-pound sirloin burgers, and is also testing breakfast bowls here in Southern California that include kale. They’re also considering serving breakfast 24 hours in some markets and even a delivery service.

McDonald's is, however, up against some formidable forces working against it. Millennials and younger customers today tend to lean more toward gourmet burger joints like Smashburger or Five Guys. Consumers are also more health conscious than they were in the past, meaning McDonald's and other fast food giants must do more to provide healthy options and be transparent about ingredients.

What does the future of fast food marketing look like? How will restaurants like McDonalds, Burger King, and Wendy’s continue to bring in customers in an age where people are more health-conscious than ever before?

Guests:

Nancy Luna, author of “The Fast Food Maven” blog at OCRegister.com where she writes about food and the fast food industry. She’s also a staff writer for the OC Register and tweets @FastFoodMaven.

Jeff Davis, chief operating officer at Sandelman, a market research and consulting firm focusing on fast food restaurants and casual dining.



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