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Author David McCullough gives flight to the Wright Brothers’ story




American aviation pioneers, the Wright brothers, in a family portrait, circa 1903. Orville is fourth from left; Wilbur stands next to him, fifth from left.
American aviation pioneers, the Wright brothers, in a family portrait, circa 1903. Orville is fourth from left; Wilbur stands next to him, fifth from left.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

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Historian and Pulitzer Prize winning author and historian David McCullough has gained notoriety for his writing on the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and Panama Canal. He tackles the progression to the airplane in his latest book, “The Wright Brothers.”

It’s been a little over 100 years since the Wright Brothers flew for the first time. Through their hardwork and determination, McCullough unfolds practical life lessons of true grit and how to handle failure. The brothers did everything themselves without financial backers or a college education.

Often overlooked in this monumental American story, their sister Katharine Wright is put into the limelight for the first time. Who at one point took a leave of absence from a teaching job to take care of Orville after a terrible crash at Fort Meyer, which ultimately saved his life. From missing teeth, cheating death to dealing with global fame McCullough offers an in depth look into the brothers’ journey of flight.

Guest:

David McCullough, author of “The Wright Brothers” (Simon and Schuster, 2015); two-time Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom



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