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Next steps after peculiar role reversal by Democrats on the Trans-Pacific Partnership




Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) answers questions from reporters following the weekly Democratic caucus policy luncheon at the U.S. Capitol May 5, 2015 in Washington, DC.
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) answers questions from reporters following the weekly Democratic caucus policy luncheon at the U.S. Capitol May 5, 2015 in Washington, DC.
Win McNamee/Getty Images

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President Obama and his party are heading opposite ways over the proposed trade deal with Asia known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Yesterday, all but one Democratic Senator voted against the fast-track authority the White House says is essential to the deal's passage. The vote displayed the growing power of the progressive, anti-free trade, wing of the Democratic party. It also left the President in the odd position of being caught in a dispute between the parties, while standing on the side of Congressional Republicans.

Will a compromise be reached allowing a straight up or down vote on the pact?  Is the deal's only chance for passage the fast-track up and down vote the President wants?

Guests:

Mireya Solis, Philip Knight Chair in Japan Studies and a senior fellow on foreign policy in the Center for East Asia Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution

Shane Larson, legislative director for the Communications Workers of America, a labor union representing 700,000 workers in telecom, media, airlines, and manufacturing