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El Nino could mean an end to California’s extreme drought conditions




A rainbow forms behind giant windmills near rain-soaked Interstate 10 as an El Nino-influenced storm passes over the state on December 17, 2002 near Palm Springs, California.
A rainbow forms behind giant windmills near rain-soaked Interstate 10 as an El Nino-influenced storm passes over the state on December 17, 2002 near Palm Springs, California.
David McNew/Getty Images

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We are seeing more and more extreme storms, massive floods, and longer wet spells across the U.S.

In fact, Southern California is experiencing one of its wettest springs, with Los Angeles seeing four times its average rainfall. This El Nino weather  phenomenon is only becoming more prevalent, and  it’s likely we’ll see more of it as the climate continues to change.

El Niños have been responsible for two of California's worst rainy seasons: the winters of 1982-83 and 1997-98. And now signs are showing that a strong El Niño this winter could mean an end to California’s extreme drought.

What will the El Nino conditions mean for Southern California? Will this wet spell be enough to end the drought?

Guests:

Mike Halpert, Deputy Director of the Climate Prediction Center NOAA