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Why public attitudes shift before major Supreme Court rulings




Protesters hold a pro-gay rights flag outside the US Supreme Court on April 25, 2015, countering the demonstrators who attended the March For Marriage in Washington, DC.
Protesters hold a pro-gay rights flag outside the US Supreme Court on April 25, 2015, countering the demonstrators who attended the March For Marriage in Washington, DC.
PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images

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The Supreme Court is expected to issue decisions on two major issues this month, and while their rulings may be groundbreaking, the big topics at hand (same sex marriage and healthcare) are issues that the nine justices have gone over time and time again.

Unfortunately, despite the High Court’s experience dealing with both issues, there’s still a good bit of skepticism about the Supreme Court’s ability to handle these two landmark decisions.

According to a new CNN/ORC poll, a majority of Americans, 52 percent, approve of the way the Supreme Court is handling its job, while 41 percent disapprove. But when asked about their confidence in the Supreme Court’s ability to handle specific issues, only 50 percent said they have at least a moderate amount of trust on healthcare, and 49 percent on same-sex marriage.

How confident are you in the Supreme Court’s ability to do its job? To handle specific issues like same-sex marriage and healthcare? Why do public attitudes shift like this before major Supreme Court rulings?

Guests:

David Savage, Supreme Court reporter for the L.A. Times’ Washington Bureau

Adam Liptak, Supreme Court reporter for The New York Times