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Charleston massacre felt here in Southern California




Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) joins members of the US House of Representatives and members of the US Senate in a prayer circle in front of the US Capitol to honor those gunned down last night inside the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston South Carolina, June 18, 2015 in Washington, DC.
Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) (L) joins members of the US House of Representatives and members of the US Senate in a prayer circle in front of the US Capitol to honor those gunned down last night inside the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston South Carolina, June 18, 2015 in Washington, DC.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

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Dylann Storm Roof, the man suspected of killing nine people at a church in South Carolina, has been arrested.

Yesterday’s shooting at the historic Emmanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston left six women and three men dead, including the Reverend Clementa Pinckney. Investigators are trying to determine if the suspect had links to hate groups, particularly as the attack may have been a hate crime.

As more details come out, how have you responded to the shooting in Charleston? Will this have an effect on the national conversation surrounding gun violence? Can (and should) this crime be brought into a larger context about race relations in America?

Guests:

Chris Haire, Editor of the Charleston City Paper

Pastor J. Edgar Boyd, Senior Minister of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church of Los Angeles, a 142-year old institution

Charles Kurzman, teaches sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Kurzman co-wrote an opinion piece in The New York Times this week highlighting the threat posed by white supremacists, “The Other Terror Threat