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Should South Carolina take down the Confederate Flag?




Hundreds of people gather for a protest rally against the Confederate flag in Columbia, South Carolina on June 20, 2015. The racially divisive Confederate battle flag flew at full-mast despite others flying at half-staff in South Carolina after the killing of nine black people in an historic African-American church in Charleston on June 17. Dylann Roof, the 21-year-old white male suspected of carrying out the Emanuel African Episcopal Methodist Church bloodbath, was one of many southern Americans who identified with the 13-star saltire in red, white and blue.
Hundreds of people gather for a protest rally against the Confederate flag in Columbia, South Carolina on June 20, 2015. The racially divisive Confederate battle flag flew at full-mast despite others flying at half-staff in South Carolina after the killing of nine black people in an historic African-American church in Charleston on June 17. Dylann Roof, the 21-year-old white male suspected of carrying out the Emanuel African Episcopal Methodist Church bloodbath, was one of many southern Americans who identified with the 13-star saltire in red, white and blue.
MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images

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There has been a fluster of debate this week on whether South Carolina should take down the Confederate flag. This is in the wake of last week’s deadly shooting where known white supremacist Dylann Roof shot and killed 9 people at the  Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston.

A press conference is scheduled today at 4pm EST by South Carolina governor Nikki Haley who is expected to call on the South Carolina General Assembly to remove the Confederate flag from the north lawn of the South Carolina State House in downtown Columbia, South Carolina.

Guests:

Don Doyle, McCausland Professor of History at University of South Carolina and author of The Cause of All Nations: An International History of the American Civil War (Basic, 2015)

Christine Mai-Duc, Reporter for the LA Times

Yoni Abblebaum, Senior editor, politics for the Atlantic