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Conservatives fight to protect religious freedom laws in wake of same sex marriage decision




An anti same-sex marriage demonstrator stands in front of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, June 18, 2015, awaiting the court's landmark decision.
An anti same-sex marriage demonstrator stands in front of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, June 18, 2015, awaiting the court's landmark decision.
JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

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Last week same sex marriage became legal in all 50 states.

The 5 to 4 decision made by the Supreme Court Friday states that the right to marry is fundamental and Supreme Court Justice Kennedy wrote that under the 14th Amendment's protections "couples of the same-sex may not be deprived of that right and that liberty.”

Now that the decision has been made and millions of America’s same sex couples have the right to marry, many conservative lawmakers are pushing back stating that this decision is a violation on  religious freedom laws. Their concern is that faith-based organizations will be restricted on who they can hire and fire based on their religious beliefs.

Is it possible for a balance to be struck between religious freedom and protections against the discrimination of gays?

Guests:

John Eastman, professor of law and founding director of the Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence at Chapman University.

Doug NeJaime, a Professor of Law at UC Irvine and Visiting Scholar at the Williams Institute at UCLA, a research institution focusing on gender identity law