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After Charleston massacre: Gun rights groups fight ‘gun-free zones’




An attendee wears a 2nd amendment shirt while inspecting an assault rifle during the 2013 NRA Annual Meeting and Exhibits at the George R. Brown Convention Center on May 5, 2013 in Houston, Texas.
An attendee wears a 2nd amendment shirt while inspecting an assault rifle during the 2013 NRA Annual Meeting and Exhibits at the George R. Brown Convention Center on May 5, 2013 in Houston, Texas.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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South Carolina gun control activists hope to tackle the region's permissive gun laws in the aftermath of the Charleston massacre, but they face stiff opposition from gun rights groups.

For instance, second amendment activist Paul Valone says the Charleston shooting proves South Carolina ought to allow guns in churches as does his state of North Carolina. Valone’s intent is to reduce “victim disarmament.” As for gun permitting, at present, the Palmetto state does not require a registration of, nor a permit to purchase, handguns, rifles, and shotguns.

A recent bill that saw an overwhelming show of support in South Carolina’s legislature (before dying when the session adjourned for the summer) would have allowed people to carry concealed weapons “for lawful purposes” on their person without a permit, instead of requiring a gun education course and a minimum age of 21.

In North Carolina, HB 562, seeks to repeal requiring permits for handgun purchases and to restrict doctors from discussing firearms with their patients.

Ladd Everitt of the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence says the “degenerate gun culture” of the South was a contributing factor to the Charleston massacre and hopes the aftermath will limit the National Rifle Association’s fealty with the South.

Will the latest ostentatious act of gun violence influence state lawmakers? The National Rifle Association says some politicians are either "[capitalizing] on a tragedy for political purposes" or "their urge to 'do something' isn't tempered by a sense of reality." What, if any, laws could have stopped the alleged shooter, Dylann Roof?

Guests:

Paul Valone, President, Grass Roots North Carolina - described as an all-volunteer organization dedicated to preserving freedoms guaranteed by the Bill of Rights.

Ladd Everitt, Director of Communications, Coalition to Stop Gun Violence