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In face of severe drought, can growth be sustained in CA?




A worker cuts a piece of pipe as he builds a new home on January 21, 2015 in Petaluma, California.
A worker cuts a piece of pipe as he builds a new home on January 21, 2015 in Petaluma, California.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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The CA Water Commission has put in place new limits on the amount of grass and lawn space new constructions -- including homes, businesses, schools -- in the state can have.

Under the revised ordinance, only 25 percent of a new home’s yard space can be grass.

California’s drought, now in its fourth year, has reopened the debate over how much growth the state can sustain in the face of a prolonged water shortage.

Can California accommodate the kind of population and economic growth it has seen historically? Should the state consider measures to rein in new housing developments? Is the drought the immovable object that would make us rethink how much California can reasonably grow?

Consideration of Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance Regulations

Guests:

Adam Nagourney, Los Angeles Bureau Chief for the New York Times. He is the reporter behind a recent story in the paper, titled “California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth

Jay R. Lund, Director, Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California - Davis; and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering