Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Ashley Madison site hackers claim ethical intentions




A man looks at a dating site Ashley Madison on his computer in Washington,DC on February 10, 2014.
A man looks at a dating site Ashley Madison on his computer in Washington,DC on February 10, 2014.
EVA HAMBACH/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

18:08
Download this story 8MB

The group claiming to have hacked cheaters' website Ashley Madison for personal information of millions of adulterers allege the company failed to secure users' data.

The so-called Impact Team hackers highlight that Ashley Madison advertises a $19 service fee to members cancelling accounts who want assurances all data will be deleted, but the hackers call that "a complete lie." The group is demanding the site used by "cheating dirtbags" be shut-down or it will release all customer records because they “deserve no discretion.”

What do you think is the real motivation of the hackers? Did Ashley Madison fail to protect user data by linking accounts with payment information? Is it unethical, or a straightforward business cost, for websites to charge a premium to scrub user accounts?

Guests:

Mary Anne Franks, Associate Professor of Law, University of Miami School of Law; Legislative & Tech Policy Director of  the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative (that advocates on behalf of victims of nonconsensual porn); Her research research and teaching interests include cyberlaw and privacy

Paul F. Roberts, Editor in Chief, The Security Ledger, a publication covering all things cyber security in Boston; "Parent Firm of Ashley Madison Faces Extinction Level Hack "