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GOP 2016: Popular among younger Republicans, Rand tries to be his own Paul




U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) (L) talks to his father former Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) (R) during a news conference June 22, 2011 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC
U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) (L) talks to his father former Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) (R) during a news conference June 22, 2011 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC
Alex Wong/Getty Images

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Following in your father’s footsteps can be tricky, especially when your father is arguably one of the most respected and influential politicians in recent history. And while his intent may not have been to walk the same career path his father did, Rand Paul is trying to accomplish something his father couldn’t: become President of the United States.

A physician like his dad, Rand Paul started practicing ophthalmology in Kentucky after completing his medical residency in 1993, and opened his own practice in 2007. Several years later, in 2010, he put medicine on the back burner and turned his focus to politics, running for and eventually winning now-former Senator Jim Bunning’s seat.

He describes himself as a “Constitutional conservative,” supports a flat tax, is a huge advocate for privacy reform, and is pro-life. His stance on same-sex marriage is nuanced; he has said in the past that he does not agree with same-sex marriage personally, but believes it’s an issue that should be decided by the states.

Who is Rand Paul, the candidate? What is his platform? How has he made an effort to create his own name and identity, rather than simply being associated with his father?

Guests:

Al Cross, associate professor in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications and director of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues at the University of Kentucky. Prior to his professorship, Cross was a reporter and eventually chief political writer for the The Courier-Journal in Louisville