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Europe’s refugee crisis and the ethics of posting photo of dead Syrian toddler




'Body bags' are pictured on Brighton beach in southern England, on April 22, 2015, during a photocall by Amnesty International to highlight what they claim is Britain's shameful response to the refugee and migrant crisis in the Mediterranean. A debate has opened up over when and how graphic pictures should be shown on media with the death of a Syrian toddler earlier this week
'Body bags' are pictured on Brighton beach in southern England, on April 22, 2015, during a photocall by Amnesty International to highlight what they claim is Britain's shameful response to the refugee and migrant crisis in the Mediterranean. A debate has opened up over when and how graphic pictures should be shown on media with the death of a Syrian toddler earlier this week
BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images

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A photo of a dead Syrian boy who washed up on a Turkish beach went viral on social media this week. The boy was only a toddler and is one of the latest casualties of the growing migrant crisis taking place overseas.

With it now easier than ever to post images and videos to the web, what crosses the line? While the photo of the dead toddler has put a global spotlight on the migrant crisis, is it ethical to post a photo of a dead child? And are graphic images like this one harming the general public?

Guests:

Amanda Taub, reporter focusing on human rights issues and foreign policy for Vox Media. She is a former human rights lawyer. She tweets @amandataub

Bob Steele, is the Nelson Poynter Scholar for Journalism Values. He advises journalists and media leaders across the country on ethical dilemmas and leadership challenges

Liz Sly, is the Washington Post's Beirut bureau chief