Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
Health

What’s next now that CA becomes 5th state in nation to allow assisted suicide for the terminally ill




This undated photo provided by the Maynard family shows Brittany Maynard, who ended her life on Nov. 2, 2013.
This undated photo provided by the Maynard family shows Brittany Maynard, who ended her life on Nov. 2, 2013.
Maynard Family/AP

Listen to story

32:03
Download this story 15.0MB

Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law a bill that allows doctors to prescribe medication to end the lives of terminally ill patients, ending a decades-long fight in the state.

The CA law is modeled after the one voters in Oregon passed in 1994, and goes into effect January 1, 2016.

After signing the law, Gov. Brown released a statement. "I do not know what I would do if I were dying in prolonged and excruciating pain," Brown said. "I am certain, however, that it would be a comfort to be able to consider the options afforded by this bill. And I wouldn't deny that right to others."

How will the program be implemented in California? What are the pieces that need to be in place and the protocol that needs to be established?

California's AB-15 End of Life Bill

​Guest:

Toni Broaddus,  ‎California Campaign Director at Compassion & Choices, an advocacy organization  behind the push to legalize physician-assisted suicide in the state.

Dan Diaz, Brittany Maynard’s husband and an advocate of end of life options

George Eighmey , Vice President, Death with Dignity National Center based in Oregon. He was an Oregon state legislator in 1997, when Oregon law was passed. He headed Compassion in Dying of Oregon, a nonprofit that facilitated implementation of the Death of Dignity law in Oregon.

Aaron Kheriaty, psychiatrist and director of medical ethics at UC Irvine Medical School