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FBI director: ‘YouTube effect’ devastates policing, morale, recruitment




A man faces off with police on North Ave., near the site of recent riots and several blocks away from where Freddie Gray was arrested May 4, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland.
A man faces off with police on North Ave., near the site of recent riots and several blocks away from where Freddie Gray was arrested May 4, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland.
Allison Shelley/Getty Images

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Last week, FBI director James B. Comey voiced his concerns for what he called the “YouTube effect” on modern policing -- the taping of police activities by civilians and the dissemination of these videos over the Internet.

Many police officers echo what Comey said, linking the phenomenon to a drop in morale, recruitment and a rise in violent crime.

Guests:

Ken Casaday, detective in the Austin Police Department, who’s been at that department for 18 years. He is also president of the Austin Police Association, a police union

John Crank, author of “Understanding Police Culture” (Routledge, 2004) and retired professor at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Nebraska, Omaha