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New Yorker reporter ponders a future where fast food is healthy, tasty, and convenient




Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers on the day that the company announced it will only use non-GMO ingredients in its food on April 27, 2015 in Miami, Florida.
Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers on the day that the company announced it will only use non-GMO ingredients in its food on April 27, 2015 in Miami, Florida.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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Fast food of tomorrow will look nothing like your daddy’s McDonald’s, says the New Yorker’s health and science writer Michael Specter.

In a piece in this week’s magazine, Specter looks at what the future of fast food. It’d be healthy and delicious; in other words: good for you.

How would fast food chains be able to achieve such a seemingly impossible task while maintaining the convenience and price associated with fast food? What would it mean for today’s reigning fast-food king, McDonald’s?

Guest:

Michael Specter, a staff writer at the New Yorker magazine focusing on science and technology, whose latest piece “Freedom from fries,” appear in this week’s magazine. He is also the author of “Denialism: How Irrational Thinking Hinders Scientific Progress, Harms the Planet, and Threatens Our Lives” (Penguin, 2009)