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What the end of China’s one-child policy means for Southern California




A Chinese baby in the arms of his father at a furniture store in Beijing.
A Chinese baby in the arms of his father at a furniture store in Beijing.
GOH CHAI HIN/AFP/Getty Images

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China’s era of the single child is coming to an end.

The country first eased its controversial population control practice in 2013, allowing some married couples to have a second child. Today, the Communist Party has announced that it’ll drop the one-child policy altogether to counter the aging of its population.

This is good news for Chinese married couples, but could it also cause a shift in demographics in Southern California? Could we also see an increase in Chinese immigration? How will it affect Southern California’s demographic makeup?

Guests:

Clayton Dube, Director of the U.S.-China Institute at the University of Southern California

Jeremy Goldkorn,  founder and editor of Danwei, a Beijing-based research firm that tracks Chinese media, markets, politics and business