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Environment & Science

President Obama pulls the plug on Keystone pipeline




US President Barack Obama speaks on the Keystone XL pipeline, watched by Vice President Joe Biden, on November 6, 2015 in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, DC.
US President Barack Obama speaks on the Keystone XL pipeline, watched by Vice President Joe Biden, on November 6, 2015 in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, DC.
MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

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President Barack Obama killed a Canadian energy giant's application to build the Keystone XL pipeline on Friday, declaring the proposed project wouldn't serve U.S. national interests and would have undercut America's global leadership on climate change.

The decision capped a seven-year saga that spiraled into one of the biggest environmental flashpoints of Obama's presidency. Announcing his decision at the White House, Obama said he agreed with Secretary of State John Kerry, whose department recommended rejecting the proposal for a 1,179-mile pipeline crossing the nation's heartland.

He downplayed the claimed economic benefits of the pipeline, arguing it wouldn't have lowered U.S. gas prices, created long-term jobs or reduced U.S. dependency on foreign energy. 

Just because President Obama has rejected the proposal doesn't mean it'll stop being an issue in the Presidential race. A Republican President could revive the project. AirTalk parses the pros and cons of Keystone XL. 

With files from AP

Guests:

Nicolas Loris, an economist who focuses on energy, environmental and regulatory issues at The Heritage Foundation.

Josh Mogerman, The National Resources Defense Council's national media director who's been involved in the Keystone Project Campaign



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