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World weighs military, counterterrorism options after Beirut and Paris attacks




People light candles on November 16, 2015 in Strasbourg, eastern France, to pay tribute to the victims of the attacks in Paris, claimed by Islamic State which killed at least 129 people and left more than 350 injured on November 13.
People light candles on November 16, 2015 in Strasbourg, eastern France, to pay tribute to the victims of the attacks in Paris, claimed by Islamic State which killed at least 129 people and left more than 350 injured on November 13.
PATRICK HERTZOG/AFP/Getty Images

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After the unprecedented attacks on Paris Friday, world leaders are weighing their options to contain the terrorist network that calls itself the Islamic State.

Over the weekend, France launched a bombing campaign against two ISIS training camps in Syria. Following suit, U.S. warplanes struck a fleet of trucks used by the terrorist group to smuggle oil in Syria on Monday.

The coordinated terrorist attacks in Paris came after suicide bombers killed 43 people in Beirut and a Russian airliner full of passengers was downed in Egypt. ISIS has claimed responsibility for both attacks, and many say that backlash against Muslims as a result of these attacks are playing right into the Islamic State’s hand.

The attacks, they suggest, are part of a larger plan to generate hostility among citizens of Western nations towards Muslims in their countries in the hopes that the backlash will drive Western Muslims back to their native countries to organize and radicalize against the Western nations who ostracized them.

Joining guest host Patt Morrison to discuss the situations in France and Lebanon, as well as counterterrorism and military issues are our panel of guests.

Guests:

Brian Michael Jenkins, Senior Advisor to the President of the Rand Corporation and one of the nation's leading experts on terrorism and homeland security

Phil Ewing, national security editor for NPR. He tweets @philewing

Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow at the Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs of the American University of Beirut and a nonresident senior fellow in the Middle East Initiative at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Khaled Beydoun, Professor of Law, Barry University School of Law, in Orlando, FL; Beydoun’s scholarship focuses on the intersection of race, religion and national security