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Should Muslims feel pressured to speak out about terrorism?




A young Muslim woman squats outside the French Embassy among candles, messages and flowers left by mourners commemorating the victims of last Friday's terrorist attacks in Paris.
A young Muslim woman squats outside the French Embassy among candles, messages and flowers left by mourners commemorating the victims of last Friday's terrorist attacks in Paris.
Carsten Koall/Getty Images

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Muslim communities around the world have come out over the weekend to condemn the attacks in Paris.

Here in Southern California, the Islamic Center of Southern California brought together several speakers to condemn the terrorist attacks in Paris.

Twitter campaigns like #notinmyname encourage Muslims to speak out and let the world know that IS does not represent all Muslims.

But others reject that idea and feel that, as Muslims, it’s not their job to speak out about IS and terrorist attacks. If you’re a Muslim, we want to hear what kind of pressure you might be feeling to speak out.

Guests:

Salam Al-Marayati, president of the Muslim Public Affairs Council

Sadia Saifuddin, former student regent for the University of California system and the first Muslim to be a UC student regent