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2nd and 3rd generation Latinos turning to immersion programs to pass on language




Families leave after an art class in Long Beach on Thursday morning, Nov. 12, 2015 at The Family Nest, which provides bilingual early childhood education classes. Some third-generation Latinos in Southern California are choosing to learn Spanish and want their kids to learn, too.
Families leave after an art class in Long Beach on Thursday morning, Nov. 12, 2015 at The Family Nest, which provides bilingual early childhood education classes. Some third-generation Latinos in Southern California are choosing to learn Spanish and want their kids to learn, too.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC

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Fewer Latinos are speaking Spanish at home, as more of them are born and raised in the U.S.

But some second-generation parents are trying to change that.

An increasing number of parents are turning to Spanish immersion school programs to ensure the language won’t be lost on the next generation. In some cases, they are of a generation that was pushed to learn English to the exclusion of any other languages, but now see utility in passing Spanish onto their children.

The only problem is, they may not know how to speak it fluently. The U.S. Census Bureau projects that in just a few years, about one-third of Latino young people will live in a household where only English is spoken.

Are you bilingual? Or concerned about ensuring that your children will be? What challenges have you faced in growing up or trying to raise children in a bilingual household?

Read the full story here.

Guest:

Leslie Berestein Rojas, KPCC's Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter