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Environment & Science

Study author, brain expert explain implications of new research finding no differences between male and female brains




The research team led by the University of Tel Aviv’s Daphna Joel has found male and female brains do not translate into differences in cognitive abilities.
The research team led by the University of Tel Aviv’s Daphna Joel has found male and female brains do not translate into differences in cognitive abilities.
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The research team led by the University of Tel Aviv’s Daphna Joel has found male and female brains do not translate into differences in cognitive abilities.

Joel and her team poured over the brain scans of more than 1,400 men and women to reach the conclusion.

“Although there are sex/gender differences in brain structure, brains do not fall into two classes, one typical of males and the other typical of females,” the paper published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reads. “Each brain is a unique mosaic of features, some of which may be more common in females compared with males, others may be more common in males compared with females, and still others may be common in both females and males.”

What are the implications of the study?

Guests: 

Daphna Joel, lead author of the new study, “Sex beyond the genitalia: The human brain mosaic,” published in yesterday’s the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. She is a professor of psychological sciences at the University of Tel Aviv in Israel

Arthur P. Arnold, PhD, Director of the Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology of the Brain Research Institute at UCLA, and a renowned expert on brain research. He is also the editor in chief of the journal, Biology of Sex Differences.