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Should Woodrow Wilson’s legacy be re-examined?




President Woodrow Wilson (1856 - 1924) with the First Lady, Edith Wilson (1872 - 1961) riding in a carriage in New York. President Wilson was the 28th President of the United States of America.
President Woodrow Wilson (1856 - 1924) with the First Lady, Edith Wilson (1872 - 1961) riding in a carriage in New York. President Wilson was the 28th President of the United States of America.
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Recent student protests at Princeton University have brought to the fore a debate many historians have had over the decade: the legacy of Woodrow Wilson and how the 28th President of the US should be remembered.

In November, students at Princeton protested on campus demanding a more inclusive climate at the Ivy League for minority students. Among other things, protesters demanded that the name Woodrow Wilson be removed from the university. After a 32-hour sit-in, the president of the school promised to consider those demands.

Wilson is considered an icon of modern liberalism for many, but how should his views on race be factored into remembering him? Should his name be removed from Princeton and other institutions?

Guests:

Eric S. Yellin, associate professor of history and American studies at the University of Richmond and the author of “Racism in the Nation’s Service: Government Workers and the Color Line in Woodrow Wilson's America” (University of North Carolina Press, 2013)

David Greenberg, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University. He is the author of the forthcoming book, “The Republic of Spin” (W.W. Norton & Company, 2016), looking at the rise of the White House spin machine