Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Can the K-1 visa program be relied on to vet terrorists?




Anthony Ramos, a Customs and Border Protection officer, checks Chris Layman, Katy Layman, 21 months old, and Natalie Layman in at the passport control area
Anthony Ramos, a Customs and Border Protection officer, checks Chris Layman, Katy Layman, 21 months old, and Natalie Layman in at the passport control area
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Listen to story

13:31
Download this story 6MB

Last week the FBI revealed that Tashfeen Malik, the woman who is a suspect in the recent mass shooting in San Bernardino, was radicalized before she ever filled out her K-1 Visa to come to the U.S. This was evidenced by some social media posts that she had made describing her support for Jihadism.

This has sparked a demand from lawmakers and about how she was not detained by a screening process that is said to be rigorous. Reports are coming in that Malik was interviewed at the U.S. embassy in Pakistan and was vetted by five different government agencies. In addition to this her name and picture checked against a terror watch list and her fingerprints were run against two databases.

Is the K-1 Visa program strong enough? Should more have been done or is this just an example of how difficult it is to vet every single person who may intend to come to the U.S. with terrorist intentions?

Guests:

Jessica Vaughan, Director of policy studies at the Center for Immigration Studies

Alma Rosa Nieto,  Legal analyst based in Los Angeles and member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association