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CES 2016 is all about the ‘smart home,’ but will consumers sacrifice privacy for connectivity?




Samsung spokesmodel Kai Madden displays the connectivity feature on a Samsung smart refrigerator at the 2014 International CES at the Las Vegas Convention Center.
Samsung spokesmodel Kai Madden displays the connectivity feature on a Samsung smart refrigerator at the 2014 International CES at the Las Vegas Convention Center.
David Becker/Getty Images

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Every year in January, the tech world converges on Las Vegas for the Consumer Electronics Show, or CES, to showcase the best, most ambitious, and just plain coolest new technology and gadgets they’re developing.

In addition to the TVs, tablets, and VR devices that we expect to see at CES, smart home products are a big part of this year’s show.

How about a smart fridge with a full touch screen and cameras inside that can beam pictures of your food right to your smartphone? Or a smart shower head that tells you when you’re wasting water?

These are just the beginning of the kinds of tech that aims to bring connectivity on several platforms to the average home. But as homes become more connected and the ‘Internet of Things’ becomes more of a reality, there also comes a risk of invasion of privacy.

For every new tech product that comes out, there’s always someone who figures out how to hack into it.

How much are consumers willing to sacrifice in terms of privacy in order to have a connected home? And why do some consumers not even think twice about how much privacy they’ll sacrifice when it comes to this new technology?

Guests:

Dan Ackerman, editor at CNET; he’s in Las Vegas for CES 2016 and tweeting from @danackerman

Elizabeth Weise, reporter for USA Today covering computer security, technology, and Silicon Valley