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Harvard report wants college admissions process to rely less on test scores, more on other qualities




People walk outside Harvard Law School's Langdell Hall on May 10, 2010 at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
People walk outside Harvard Law School's Langdell Hall on May 10, 2010 at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Darren McCollester/Getty Images

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A recent report put out by Making Caring Common, a project looking at reforming the college admissions process at Harvard University, wants schools to put more emphasis on an applicant's commitment to doing a greater societal good, rather than on his or her standardized test scores.

Over 50 admissions deans and educators, including those from MIT and the University of Virginia, have thrown their support behind the report and have pledged to make changes in their own admissions process. Yale, for instance, is adding an essay question in next year’s application asking applicants to detail their involvement with their communities.

What do you think of the report and its recommendations? Can they be achieve? realistically? One of the stated goals is to reduce the stress of applicants applying to college, would these recommendations help?

Guests:

Richard Weissbourd, a senior lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and co-director of Making Caring Common, which has put out the report

Steve Cohen,  co-author of “Getting In,” about the college admissions process. He is a contributor to Forbes magazine, writing about college admissions and public policy