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New study looks at how religion, class, and gender factor into self-identification of biracial Americans




Sonia Smith Kang (back row right) poses with her multiracial, multicultural family. She is Mexican-black, and her husband is Korean.
Sonia Smith Kang (back row right) poses with her multiracial, multicultural family. She is Mexican-black, and her husband is Korean.
Sonia Smith-Kang

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A Pew report from last year found that multiracial adults make up close to 7 percent of the US population. It’s projected that by 2050, one in five Americans will be multiracial.

As it grows, how those in this population choose to identify themselves racially will have political, policy, and legislative significance.

A new study published in the journal, American Sociological Review, looks precisely at that. Author and Stanford professor Lauren Davenport surveyed how 37,000 biracial Americans (Asian-white, black-white, and Latino-white) and found that gender, class, and religion all play different roles in influencing how they choose to self-identify.

American Sociological Association Multiracial Labeling Study

Guest:

Lauren Davenport, author of the new study, “The Role of Gender, Class, and Religion in Biracial Americans’ Racial Labeling Decisions,” published in the February issue of American Sociological Review. She is also an assistant professor of Political Science at Stanford University