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Analyzing the GOP presidential landscape after Trump chalks up another win in the Nevada caucuses




Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to guest gathered during a campaign event at the International Air Response facility.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to guest gathered during a campaign event at the International Air Response facility.
Ralph Freso/Getty Images

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After handily securing wins in the New Hampshire and South Carolina primaries, it was all about the Donald once again Tuesday night.

Just over 45 percent of registered Nevada Republicans caucused for the New York real estate mogul. Marco Rubio finished a distant second, just shy of 24 percent of the vote, and Ted Cruz came in third with 21 percent.

Trump’s win in The Silver State make the climb back to the top that much harder for the rest of the field. Super Tuesday is looming large and could still swing the delegate balance, but it won’t be an easy path back to the top for any of the remaining candidates.

What are the implications of Trump’s win in Nevada? What changes about the lay of the land for the GOP candidates? Do you think there’s any chance Super Tuesday will swing the balance of delegates to another candidate?

Guests:

Lisa Camooso Miller, Republican strategist and partner at Blueprint Communications, public affairs firm based in D.C.; she tweets @camoosomiller  

Robert de Posada, president of ONE Marketing & Research Inc., a public relations and communications firm in D.C., founder of  the nonprofit The Latino Coalition, and had served on the National Commission to Save and Strengthen Social Security under George W. Bush; he tweets @rdeposada