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Merrick Garland nomination resets partisan political maneuvering




Judge Merrick Garland (C) speaks after US President Barack Obama, with Vice President Joe Biden (L), announced Garland's nomination to the US Supreme Court.
Judge Merrick Garland (C) speaks after US President Barack Obama, with Vice President Joe Biden (L), announced Garland's nomination to the US Supreme Court.
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

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Earlier this morning, President Obama announced his nominee for the Supreme Court.

63-year-old DC circuit appeals judge Merrick Garland is the pick. He's considered the most moderate of the three finalists. However, Senate Republicans still see him as a threat to overturn rulings that are extremely important to conservatives. Senate leaders say they won't consider him, or anyone.

However, if Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders wins the Presidency, might Republicans decide Judge Garland is the best they can get, and move to confirm him before the new President takes office? Might Obama counter by withdrawing Garland's nomination?

Guests:

Michele Jawando, Vice President for Legal Progress at The Center for American Progress

George Zornick, Washington DC Editor of The Nation magazine