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Setting up the money, delegate math, and more after big wins for Clinton, Trump on Super Tuesday 3




Supporters react after a primary night event for Republican presidential candidate U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) on March 15, 2016 in Miami, Florida.
Supporters react after a primary night event for Republican presidential candidate U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) on March 15, 2016 in Miami, Florida.
Angel Valentin/Getty Images

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Tuesday’s primaries featured a couple of important storylines.

One was the importance of Senator Marco Rubio and Governor John Kasich winning in their home states of Florida and Ohio, respectively, as they hoped to impede Donald Trump’s path to the Republican nomination.

Governor Kasich pulled out the win he needed.

Senator Rubio, however, did not, and suspended his campaign shortly Florida was called for Donald Trump, who also won in Illinois, North Carolina, and is leading in Missouri despite the race there having yet to be called.

The other important storyline was whether Bernie Sanders could pull off another upset victory in Ohio like he did in Michigan, both states where manufacturing jobs are vanishing and his message condemning U.S. foreign trade deals has gone over well. Sanders wasn’t able to pull out any victories, and will have to hope to edge Clinton in Missouri, which is still too close to call. leaving his campaign with some very difficult delegate math if he wants to remain in the game.

The race isn’t over, however, and there’s still plenty to look at in terms of how the frontrunners position themselves moving forward and what the remaining candidates can do to slow them down. We’ll also take a look at where things stand with campaign finance and donations, and the influence it’s had thus far on the 2016 election.

Guests:

Steven Shepard, campaigns and elections editor for POLITICO; he tweets @POLITICO_Steve

Kevin Wagner, associate professor of political science at Florida Atlantic University; he tweets @KevinWagnerPhD

Matea Gold, national political reporter for the Washington Post covering money and influence; she tweets @mateagold