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After Abdeslam capture, authorities are now focused on interrogation and intelligence




French Interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve arrives to deliver a speech after a Defence Council with French ministers and security officials after the arrest in Brussels of Salah Abdeslam.
French Interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve arrives to deliver a speech after a Defence Council with French ministers and security officials after the arrest in Brussels of Salah Abdeslam.
ALAIN JOCARD/AFP/Getty Images

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After Friday’s dramatic capture of alleged Paris bomber Salah Abdeslam, authorities now turn their attention to extracting information from him to piece together the original attacks and foil any possible plots in the future.

Belgium’s security chief has stressed the importance of catching Abdeslam alive. Investigators in that country have begun the interrogation process, as French officials work to extradite Abdeslam.

Abdeslam was wounded and captured on Friday in an anti-terrorism raid conducted by Belgian authorities in the Molenbeek neighborhood of Brussels. The 26-year-old is currently held in a prison in Bruges, and his lawyer has said that he’ll fight the extradition request.

The Nov. 13 attacks in Paris killed 130 people.

What information do authorities hope to get from Abdeslam? What interrogation tactics are used by the Belgians and the French?

Guests:

Brian Michael Jenkins, Senior Advisor to the President of the Rand Corporation and one of the nation's leading experts on terrorism and homeland security

Jonathan Horowitz, Legal officer for the Open Society Justice Initiative - an advocacy organization. He focuses on issues of human rights, national security and counterterrorism, and the law of armed conflict