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Why swearing may not be as bad as you think




Director Kevin Smith attends the George Carlin Tribute hosted by Whoopi Goldberg at the New York Public Library
Director Kevin Smith attends the George Carlin Tribute hosted by Whoopi Goldberg at the New York Public Library
Bryan Bedder/Getty Images

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Many of us were taught as children that using profanities is a bad thing. A foul mouth gives off the impression of rudeness or low intelligence.

But as a recent article in BBC’s Future reports, swearing has some surprisingly positive effects from increasing a person’s tolerance to pain to raising feelings of solidarity among team members.

Evidence  suggests that  the brain area activated by swear words, is separate from the cortex and left hemisphere, the parts of the brain which handles most language, which may explain some of these unexpected benefits.

Guests:

Tiffanie Wen, Freelance Contributor for the BBC in Tel Aviv; @tiffaniewen

Richard Stephens, Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Keele University in the United Kingdom and author of the book “Black Sheep: The Hidden Benefits of Being Bad.” In 2010, he won the Ig Nobel Peace Prize for his research confirming that swearing relieves pain