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New rooms discovered in King Tut’s tomb could hold 'discovery of the century'




Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass (3rd L) supervises the removal of the lid of the sarcophagus of King Tutankhamun in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, 04 November 2007.
Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass (3rd L) supervises the removal of the lid of the sarcophagus of King Tutankhamun in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, 04 November 2007.
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Egypt’s most famous mummified monarch may have more to tell us about his life, death, and maybe even where his equally famous mother is buried.

Radar scans of the tomb of King Tutankhamun, also known as King Tut, have revealed two previously undiscovered rooms that Egypt’s antiquities ministry says contain metal and organic masses. It has also been theorized that Queen Nefertiti, King Tut’s mother, may be buried in one of these rooms. If the radar scans are correct, there’s no telling what other artifacts or funerary items could also be inside.

British archaeologists originally discovered the tomb in 1922, creating a worldwide wave of interest in ancient Egyptian history. Tutankhamun became King Tut at the age of 10, earning him the nickname ‘The Boy King.’ He died at age 18, and though the cause of his death is still unknown, it is believed he died from a combination of complications due to a broken leg and malarial infection.

Guest:

James Phillips,  Professor Emeritus at The University of Illinois-Chicago, and Curator of Ancient Egypt at The Field Museum in Chicago. He was Curator of the recent Mummies exhibit at Los Angeles Museum of Natural History