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With link between Zika and microcephaly established, should CDC issue recommendation for women to delay pregnancy?




Dr. Valeria Barros treats a 6-week old baby born with microcephaly at the Lessa de Andrade polyclinic during a physical therapy session on January 29, 2016 in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil.
Dr. Valeria Barros treats a 6-week old baby born with microcephaly at the Lessa de Andrade polyclinic during a physical therapy session on January 29, 2016 in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

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With the link between Zika and birth deformities confirmed, health officials at the Centers for Disease Control are now grappling with the question of whether to advise women to delay pregnancy.

The virus has been found in as many as 30 states, including California, Texas, and Arizona. Health officials are bracing for potential outbreaks stateside this summer.

Proponents say the consequences of Zika are severe enough to justify a recommendation, yet opponents argue that women should be informed of the risks of infection but be free to make their own decisions.

Guests:

William Schaffner, MD., Professor of Preventive Medicine at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN. He’s worked on a range of CDC advisory committees

Peter Jay Hotez, MD, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX